Title: September
Artist: Earth, Wind & Fire
Played: 923 times

kozmic-vibrations:

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filed under: # happy 1st

sixpenceee:

10 year old Yemeni girl smiling after she was granted a divorce from her husband- a 30 year old man

Here’s what I found after looking into it. 

Nujood Ali was nine when her parents arranged a marriage to Faez Ali Thamer, a man in his thirties. Regularly beaten by her in-laws and raped by her husband, Ali escaped on April 2, 2008, two months after the wedding.

On the advice of her father’s second wife, she went directly to court to seek a divorce. After waiting for half a day, she was noticed by a judge, Mohammed al-għadha, who gave her refuge. He had both her father and husband taken into custody.

Indeed, publicity surrounding Ali’s case is said to have inspired efforts to annul other child marriages, including that of an 8 year old Saudi girl who was allowed to divorce a middle-aged man in 2009.

BUT In 2013 Ali reported to the media that her father had forced her out of their home and is withholding her money granted by publishers. Her father has also arranged a marriage for her younger sister, Haifa.

I GOT THE INFORMATION FROM THIS WIKI PAGE

Also this girl has her own book


filed under:

taco-bell-rey:

"ew fast food, do you even know what they put in fast food-"

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filed under: # yep

s/o to all the long haired ppl out there who can manage to get thru the day. after two weeks of school i knew i had to cut my hair 💇



seedy:

"haha i don’t care" 

*goes home and cries*


filed under: # me

my parents have been drinking and partying with family and friends all day and im just like i want to read in peace pls i dont want to hear yall talking abt sex and shouting obnoxiously to each other. i came home to have a relaxing weekend



“Wong’s chief inspiration for Chungking Express was a short story entitled ‘On Seeing the 100% Perfect Girl One Beautiful April Morning’ by the Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. The story is about the mutability of perceptions, and begins with the sentence, ‘One fine April morning, I passed my 100% woman on a Harajuku back street.’ Chungking Express similarly begins with a chance encounter, which becomes a motif in the first episode…

Wong develops the themes of chimerical relationships with the same evanescence displayed in Murakami’s short story. People’s lives just touch but never interpenetrate (maybe they do not even touch but just brush past, mere possibilities, foregone opportunities to connect, impermanence). Like Murakami, Wong injects a sense of magical element into everyday life but with a sense of fatal consequences. Like Murakami, he invokes icons from popular culture to suggest the part that memory plays.”

(From Wong Kar-wai by Stephen Teo, 50-51)


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“When you commit to doing something, you make a promise to yourself. And when you break that promise out of laziness, discouragement, or fear, you are only cheating yourself. You are not “getting away with something.” You are only getting away from your own potential. When you commit to making your dream come true, that is the promise you simply decide to never, ever break. It doesn’t matter how many times you get discouraged, or exhausted, or frustrated, you just remember that you have not given yourself the option to quit. That is what commitment is — when the idea of ever stopping your efforts simply doesn’t exist. You have infinite patience and resilience because there is no other option. You have the ability to bear the pain and frustration because you must find a way to beat it. It doesn’t mean it won’t feel hard to press on — it might feel impossible, and yet you still find a way to keep going. You simply always press on. At a certain point, all your effort and energy and power is only directed towards your dream, and you no longer have to waste any energy on trying to motivate yourself to keep going.”

On discouragement.  (via arabellesicardi)


filed under: # mantra

miss-catastrofes-naturales:

Akuma Aisawa, Each day I am a different person


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sr